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The Marguerite Daisy

Marguerite Daisy - Argyranthemum frutescens 'Madeira Double White'

The Marguerite Daisy is Argyranthemum frutescens a wonderful free flowering summer plant that produce masses of flowers forming a carpet above the foliage.

These plant get a bit of criticisim, perhaps because Marguerite Daisies are so easy to grow, howewer they have so many good points, and look so good for months that we think every garden has a place for them.

Low growing to around 2' they form a nice mound and are well suited to growing in containers where they will spill over the edge to provide an attractive display over several weeks.

Best growing conditions are in the cooler temperate zones where they will flower from spring right through to fall. In the warmer zones theytend to have a bit of a rest from flowering mid summer, but bounce back in early fall.

In warmer zones they can be treated as a oerennial, in colder zones as a oerennial, however wherever they are grown they are a picture when in full flower.

Marguerite Daisy - Argyranthemum 'Summer Eyes'

Varieties

Lots of cultivars are around going under names including Argyranthemum madiera.
  • Argyranthemum frutescens with atractive yellow or white flowers
  • Argyranthemum 'Summer Eyes', pictired right, clean white petals with a crimson centre.
  • Argyranthemum 'Sunny Days' pale lemon yellow petals with a buttery golden yellow centre.
  • Argyranthemum madeira White
  • Argyranthemum madeira Crested Violet
  • Argyranthemum madeira Crested Yellow
  • Argyranthemum 'Cherry Red'
  • Argyranthemum 'Deep Pink'

Propagation

Easy from cuttings cuttings taken in late spring to summer.

In spring softwood cuttings are easy, hardwood cuttings can be taken year round they all generally strike easily.

You will need some potting mix, or you could use some propagation mix, however Marguerite Daisies do strike easily.

  • Look for good straight growth around 6 inches long and using clean sharp Secateurs take the cutting just below a bud, or where a leaf joins the stem.
  • You will need choose non flowering shoots.
  • The leaves from the lower 2/3 of the cutting need to be removed, but make sure you leave 3 - 4 leaves on the top portion.
  • Some gardeners like to use a rooting hormone, powdered or liquid, others do not bother.
  • Use a pencil to make a hole in the potting mix, insert the cutting around 1 inch and firm in.
  • Water with a liquid seaweed fertilizer and then cover the plants, in the pots with a plastic bag.
  • The plastic bag helps retain humidity.
  • The cuttings need to placed in a position where they get good light, but not high heat. A window sill is excellent, however outdoors in the garden works just as well.

Cuttings should show signs of growth in 3 - 4 weeks and are often ready to transplant in 2 - 3 months.